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Superstition - Stevie Wonder

Superstition

Talking Book
funk soul 70s motown funky


"Superstition" is a popular song written, produced, arranged, and performed by Stevie Wonder for Motown Records in 1972, when Wonder was twenty-two years old. It was included on Wonder's Talking Book album and released as a single in many countries. It reached number one in the USA, and number eleven in the UK, in February 1973. Wonder had actually written this song for Jeff Beck, but at the insistence of his own manager, Wonder himself recorded it first. Beck was instead offered "Cause We've Ended As Lovers", which he recorded for 1975's Blow by Blow. Jeff Beck played guitar on Talking Book and later recorded his own version of "Superstition" with Beck, Bogert & Appice. Wonder's music had been undergoing a marked change from his earlier Motown pop to a more personal style. This shift had been evident on his two prior albums, but it was Talking Book, and "Superstition" in particular that brought the new style to the awareness of the public in general. The song deals with superstitions, and mentions several popular fables in its lyrics. "Superstition" is immediately recognizable for its opening drum beat, which was performed by Wonder, and for its notably funky clavinet riff. The song also heavily features brass instruments and saxophones, notably a trumpet lead by Trevor Laurence, and the electronic Arp and Moog synthesizer sounds that Malcolm Cecil and Robert Margouleff helped to create for the album. Wonder performed "Superstition" on the children's television show Sesame Street in 1972, as well as on Soul Train and WNET's Soul. The song also featured in a series of commercials for Levi's jeans, broadcast in the United States in late 2006. The song was featured in a scene of John Carpenter's The Thing. T.K. Carter's character, Nauls, listens to it on a boom box in the kitchen, defiantly turning up the volume when he is asked to turn it down. It was featured in the end credits of Wes Craven's Vampire In Brooklyn and also in the movie I, Robot starring Will Smith where Smith's character plays it after waking up. The song has also been covered by Melvin Van Peebles, Raven-Symone, and Stevie Ray Vaughan. (Vaughan and Wonder had mutual admiration for one another; Wonder would later write the song "Stevie Ray Blues" in honor of Vaughan). Bucky Covington covered the song on the fifth season of American Idol, and his version was included on the CD. The song is also covered by Widespread Panic along with the Dirty Dozen Brass Band on Panic's 2000 release Another Joyous Occasion. The song was also mixed by Alicia Keys in the song "Karma (Karmastition Remix)". In November 2004, Rolling Stone ranked Superstition at #74 on their list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.


Stevie Wonder is the stage name of Stevland Hardaway Morris (b. Stevland Hardaway Judkins, 13 May 1950 in Saginaw, MI, USA - a.k.a. Little Stevie Wonder), a singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, record producer and activist. He débuted, as Little Stevie Wonder, with the single "I Call It Pretty Music, But the Old People Call It the Blues" (1961, Tamla Motown) and his latest album is "A Time 2 Love" (Oct 2005, Motown) Stevland lost his eyesight shortly after birth. Show more ...

Superstition - Stevie Wonder

Very superstitious,
Writing's on the wall,
Very superstitious,
Ladders bout' to fall,
Thirteen month old baby,
Broke the lookin' glass
Seven years of bad luck,
The good things in your past

[Chorus:]
When you believe in things
That you don't understand,
Then you suffer,
Superstition aint the way

Hey

[Verse 2:]
Very superstitious,
Wash your face and hands,
Rid me of the problem,
Do all that you can,
Keep me in a daydream,
Keep me goin' strong,
You don't wanna save me,
Sad is the soul

[Chorus:]
When you believe in things
That you don't understand,
Then you suffer,
Superstition ain't the way,
Yeh, yeh

Very superstitious,
Nothin' more to say,
Very superstitious,
The devil's on his way,
Thirteen month old baby,
Broke the lookin' glass,
Seven years of bad luck,
Good things in your past

When you believe in things
That you don't understand,
Then you suffer,
Superstition ain't the way,
No, no, no



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